How Support Orders Are Made

Once the court or Child Support Enforcement Agency (CSEA) establishes a support order, the order can be modified to reflect changing life circumstances. For instance, when one party or the other loses a job or gains income. And orders can be terminated for a variety of reasons, such as when a child turns 18.

And in cases when an obligor (the person ordered to pay support) falls behind in making payments, the CSEA may use any of several methods to enforce the order.

This section offers details on these and other matters of child support by choosing an option from the menu.
  1. Enforcing Orders

    Once a child support order is issued, the Child Support Enforcement Agency (CSEA) employs a variety of methods to make certain the obligor (the person ordered to pay support) meets his or her obligation.

  2. Modifying Orders

    Child support orders may be reviewed and adjusted.

  3. Obligee Responsibilities

    To help ensure successful administration and enforcement of child support cases, the Child Support Enforcement Agency (CSEA) asks obligees (persons receiving child support) to do the following.

  4. Obligor Responsibilities

    In addition to making timely child support payments, the obligor (person ordered to pay child support) must complete certain tasks.

  5. Terminating Child Support

    Child support orders can be terminated for a variety of reasons.